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Full Worm Moon Sail Print Email
Written by Office

3194332289_50564ae479.jpgDate: Thursday, March 8
Time: 18:30-23:00
Location: Based on Boat Assignment
Cost: Free Members
Requrements: ASA 101 or equivalent
Category: Full Moon Sails

 

March. March Moon as the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

Johnpaul is going out as skipper for a sail to witness the beauty of this evening! Join him and register online to reserve your space now.

Pink Full Moon Print Email
Written by Johnpaul Watts

3194332289_50564ae479.jpg

Sailing the Bay of a night with a full moon rising above you is a wondrous event. It is even more wondrous more SEA members don't want to do it!

On Friday April 6, there was such a 'Pink' full moon. This was Summer Solstice's maiden departure from her new berth at Pier 39. After a year's exile from Gas House Cove to Clipper Harbor, she now finds solace in the surge of Pier 39, close to seals and tourists.Only Thad Glass joined skipper John Paul Watts at 1830 at gate D, slip 44.

It was a clear and warm spring night. By 1920, we departed the slip with Thad at the wheel. Pier 39 presents its own problems: not only wind and current but a violent surge can affect the boat under any circumstances. Fortunately, the surge was down, the wind light to moderate - fortuitous conditions because you wouldn't want to drop your gaberdine to your knees in front of tourists, right? There is a sharp turn immediately at the harbor mouth exit, often made ominous by looming and gigantic cruise ships alongside pier 35. Thad managed the hairpin impeccably and had us raise sails to wind: there was a minor issue with the main - lack of lubrication in mast track, reefing lines self-reefing, boomvang or mainsheet not loose enough but we made good in the end (no new-fangled devices for Summer Solstice, such as a roller furler jib). Keeping sharp lookout (Rule 5) for moving or flashing lights, other than landside traffic signals, and heading NNW, we were chatting about things nautical, enjoying the warmth of the evening, when we realized the moon had snuck up behind us into the sky over Alcatraz. How full she was: roundly perfect. Almost pink! Blushing, perhaps, from the brazenness of slipping our attention.

Slipping our attention, too, was the beginning flood: despite 8 knots of wind, 150% jib and the centerboard down, Summer Solstice was looking to make the Alcatraz shoreline (that 'rock' is such a pain in the transom, isn't it?). Then, disturbing our peace and the serenity of the moon further, a container ship with a string of white lights was rounding Alcatraz in the north channel toward 'HR' and Little Harding. We were forced to evaluate if we were or were not in its path (Rule 9), and must take evasive action. Fortunately, the beast passed two (of its) boat-lengths across our bow. The wind was now a breeze and we, still short of Harding Rock buoy. 'Ready to Tack' called out the helm - and so we did, hardening up to put distance between we and the 'rock', for now that flood was stronger. Our range mark was the Palace of Fine Arts but the further we sailed the closer we pointed to the St Frances yacht club: yep, that thar current was setting us East.

The moon was now higher and whiter in the sky, and, matey, were we impressed! But calm waters are always ruffled: under the Golden Gate Bridge loomed a - what? and which way would it go? Richmond? Oakland? For a while we made out an impossibly dim green light with two white lights high up, one ahead and lower than the other - steamer lights. 'Ah,' we said, 'green means heading to Richmond - but wait.....' We espied dimly green and red lights - the 'it' was heading for Oakland, coming straight for us! Rule 9 again - we must not impede a ship in restricted waters. Will we clear its bow or must we come about? It was still some quarter of a mile off but....Then we realized the ship had lost its red light - we could only make out the green.

Yes! This meant we had crossed its intended course and it would pass astern of us. With one set of beady eyes watching the ship (a container no less with freight US of A can't make anymore) and the other set watching the 'set' (yes, now we were heading for Fort Mason), we surrendered to the flood: falling off, we broad-reached toward the Bay bridge - or rather 'broad-currented' - past Aquatic park, Fisherman's Wharf, Pier 39 and to the Ferry Building. Our intention was to pass under the bay bridge: with the Ferry Building more or less abeam of us at 2135, we dragged out the iron sail, lowered the jib and made for port, the moon lighting our way. With minimum breeze and a quiet surge in the harbor (those container ships set up surge like nobody's business!), we berthed Summer Solstice at 2210. put her to bed and allowed ourselves a well deserved glass of wine. Of course, you can guess to what we raised our glasses....!

November Full Moon Sail Print Email
Written by Office

3194332289_50564ae479.jpgDate: Friday, November 11
Time: 18:30-23:00
Location: Based on Boat Assignment
Cost: Free Members
Requrements: ASA 101 or equivalent
Category: Full Moon Sails

 

November. This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon!

Johnpaul is going out as skipper for a sail to witness the beauty of this evening! Join him and register online to reserve your space now.

 

December Full Moon Sail Print Email
Written by Office

3194332289_50564ae479.jpgDate: Friday, December 09
Time: 18:30-23:00
Location: Based on Boat Assignment
Cost: Free Members
Requrements: ASA 101 or equivalent
Category: Full Moon Sails

December. During this month the winter cold fastens its grip, and nights are at their longest and darkest. It is also sometimes called the Moon before Yule. The term Long Night Moon is a doubly appropriate name because the midwinter night is indeed long, and because the Moon is above the horizon for a long time. The midwinter full Moon has a high trajectory across the sky because it is opposite a low Sun.

Johnpaul and Sandor are going out as skippers of this last Full Moon of the year and witness the beauty of this cold cold evening! Join them and register online to reserve your space now.

Welcome Skipper Karri Ving Print Email
Written by Office

karriCongrats to Karri Ving!

Skippered by Sandor, the Official SEA Santana Check Out Team reviewed and tested member Karri Ving's boating and safety skills on the water. She passed with flying colors and is now a bona fide SEA Santana Skipper. Karri is one our star volunteers among other titles, she was Director of SEA from 2006-2007.

They had a wonderful day out on the water, with light breezes and warm sunshine. According to Sandor, she did great all day as skipper, from the dock talk with the crew in the morning, to cleaning Shockwave and putting her away properly.  

Stephen DuPraw who recently made a comeback and Thad Glass also joined as crew also plan to be tested as SEA Skippers. Sandor said they were a great crew and  worked as a team. Thad especially seemed very comfortable working the boat, but both said they wanted to do more SEA keelboat and mentor sails before trying their hand at skipper check-out, which has high standards. 

In addition to a skipper check-out, it was also a familiarization exercise for Karri as she hadn't previously sailed the Santanas.  She has extensive sailing experience on larger keelboats (~30') and has been teaching in the smaller Catalinas many years. 

Interested in Becoming a Skipper? Print Email
Written by Helena Ghez

Skipper_ChrisHave you ever thought about becoming a skipper?  If so, consider coming out for a Mentor Sail!  This past Sunday, Chris, our skipper of the day, volunteered his time to train Eric, Joe and me (Helena).   Thank you, Chris!

As soon as I took the helm, Chris threw a floatation device overboard, and suddenly (and unexpectedly), I had to practice my skills at picking up a “COB”!  It was a great task since that’s how it would happen in the real world.  It’s not an event that you plan; it happens when you least expect it.  While I had to do a figure-eight 3 times before I got the device, it was incredible practice.  And, that’s what this day was about…practice, practice, practice.  Besides several COB exercises, Chris had us doing three jibes in a row, 360 degree turns, docking, heaving-to (and eating lunch) and sailing to a destination (and talking about our course).  We all came back to the dock excited about the next mentor sail where we’ll cover sailing by the lee, anchoring and reefing while sailing.

Shockwave and Heatwave are great Santanas – let’s get out there and use them!

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